Category Archives: Investigative journalism

DOPESICK by Beth Macy

As I noted in my review of Dreamland by Sam Quinones, most of us either know someone or know someone who knows someone who has suffered from opioid addiction. This horrifying epidemic, precipitated by the release of the addictive painkiller … Continue reading

Posted in Crime, Drug addiction, For BUSINESS PEOPLE, For EDUCATORS, For PARENTS, History, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

UNBELIEVABLE by Katy Tur

This book got me into some trouble–well, this book and the other four I brought on vacation, which formed a solid, suspicious, sharp-edged block that caused a TSA agent to inform me that she needed to search my bag. I’m … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, History, Humor, Investigative journalism, Memoir, Nonfiction, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

THIEVES OF STATE by Sarah Chayes

When we reflect on politics in America, as annoying/frustrating/horrifying as things might seem, Sarah Chayes reminds us that they could always get worse. In THIEVES OF STATE: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security, she explains how corruption has overtaken Afghanistan, Nigeria, … Continue reading

Posted in For BUSINESS PEOPLE, For EDUCATORS, History, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction, Politics | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

EVICTION by Matthew Desmond

Having just finished DREAMLAND, about the opioid crisis, I turned to EVICTION, the 2017 Pulitzer Prize-winner subtitled Poverty and Profit in the American City. You could say I’m a glutton for bad news, but it’s more like I’m trying to … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology, Crime, Drug addiction, For BUSINESS PEOPLE, For EDUCATORS, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction, Poverty, Pulitzer Prize Winner, Race relations, Social Justice, Social psychology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

DREAMLAND by Sam Quinones

Depending on where you live and whom you know, you might know quite a lot about opioid addiction. You might have seen firsthand how someone goes to a doctor for back pain and ends up hooked on OxyContin. You might … Continue reading

Posted in Crime, Drug addiction, For BUSINESS PEOPLE, For EDUCATORS, For PARENTS, History, Illegal Immigration, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction, Poverty | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

RED NOTICE by Bill Browder

I admit I took my eye off the Russia ball for a while. For years, actually. Once we signed nuclear disarmament treaties with them (or first with the “Soviet Union” then “Russia”), I thought, OK, so they’re not going to … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, Crime, For BUSINESS PEOPLE, History, Investigative journalism, Memoir, Nonfiction, Russia | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DARK MONEY by Jane Mayer

Even though I knew Jane Mayer’s DARK MONEY (subtitled The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right) would be impeccably written and assiduously fact-checked (she writes for The New Yorker, and they are known for … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, For BUSINESS PEOPLE, For EDUCATORS, History, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

A DEADLY WANDERING by Matt Richtel

We have all seen it: someone looking down while driving. Texting. Heck, I saw three people doing it yesterday, when I went out on my porch to check the mail. They were driving 25 miles per hour down a crowded … Continue reading

Posted in For EDUCATORS, For PARENTS, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction, Science, Technology | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

THE BRILLIANT DISASTER by Jim Rasenberger

In preparation for my first trip to Cuba, I kept my eyes peeled for good books to boost my background knowledge. THE BRILLIANT DISASTER caught my attention, not just for its title but also for its subtitle: JFK, Castro, and … Continue reading

Posted in 1960s, For EDUCATORS, History, Investigative journalism, JFK and Castro, Nonfiction | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

KATRINA by Gary Rivlin

Ten years ago today, the National Weather Service announced that “Tropical Depression 12” had become “Hurricane Katrina.” From that point on, day after day, the news became more and more grim. We all know what happened—well, we knew what the … Continue reading

Posted in For EDUCATORS, History, Investigative journalism, Nonfiction, Race relations | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments